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The Learning Institute

The Learning Institute

Inclusive education and disability

These CPD activities are suitable for anyone working in, or interested in working with children and young people, whether that is in an educational setting or within multi-agency working.

**NEW** Disabled?: Perceptions of disability 

What does it mean to be disabled? The different ways this question can be answered has huge consequences both for individuals and for societies. One way of thinking about these different answers or perceptions is to group them in certain ways into what are termed models of disability. As practitioners, an understanding of these different models can help us reflect on and challenge our own views and those of others, which can in turn have a positive impact on our professional practice.

Download Disabled?: Perceptions of disability here

Promoting the educational achievement of Looked After Children (LAC)/children in care 

The future life chances for many looked after children (LAC)/children in care can seem very bleak.  However with patience, support and guidance these children will make progress which opens up possibilities for a successful future.

Download Promoting the educational achievement of Looked After Children (LAC)/children in care here

Supporting children learning English as an Additional Language (Parts 1 and 2) 

In 2014 the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC) audited training courses relating to English as an Additional Language (EAL) provision in 2011-12. They are running a new audit this year. In 2014 it was reported:

“EAL CPD and vocational training remains patchy, despite the increase in the numbers of pupils learning EAL since 2004.”

“There is a significant unmet demand for EAL training and CPD which is highly specific and closely related to individuals’ working context, this context includes the type of school, type of EAL learner and type of teaching work the participant is involved in.”

In surveyed schools only 3% of staff receiving specific training were non-teaching support staff.

These activities explore key principles for providing support to help practising TAs better meet the needs of children learning English as an Additional Language.

Download Supporting children learning EAL (Part 1) here
Download Supporting children learning EAL (Part 2) here

Supporting Speech, Language and Communication Needs (Parts 1-4) 

“The ability to communicate is an essential life skill for all children and young people and it underpins a child’s social, emotional and educational development.” (Bercow, 2008, p.6)

Speech, language and communication are important in almost everything we do. Being able to make our thoughts, ideas and needs known, things we like and dislike, interacting with others and making friends are critical life skills. However for many children and young people these skills are much more difficult to develop; they have speech, language and communication needs (SLCN). Every child with a speech, language or communication need is different.

We have created a four-part series of CPD activities relating to SLCN.

Part 1: This CPD activity will help you to understand the difference between a difficulty in speech, to one in language or communication. You will reflect on provision in your setting.
Download Supporting Speech, Language and Communication Needs (SLCN) - Part 1 here

Part 2: Through an understanding of the language pyramid, this second CPD opportunity will further develop your understanding of the principles associated with language development. You will look at the profile of a child who struggles with speech, language or communication, and then at strategies that may support them.
Download Supporting Speech, Language and Communication Needs (SLCN) - Part 2 here

Part 3: This CPD activity will help you to explore how to communicate effectively with parents of children and young people with SLCN and to reflect on how this communication happens in your workplace.
Download Supporting Speech, Language and Communication Needs (SLCN) - Part 3 here

Part 4: This final part of our CPD series will help you to understand the difference between a difficulty in speech, to one in language or communication. You will look at the profile of a child and strategies that may support them.
Download Supporting Speech, Language and Communication Needs (SLCN) - Part 4 here

What do we mean by inclusive education?
 

Research shows that working to promote inclusivity is critical to ensuring children and young people have positive experiences not just in education but generally in their lives. This CPD task seeks to support practitioners by helping them to understand some key principles of inclusive education and how these might be applied.

Download What do we mean by inclusive education? here

**NEW** Why listen to children and young people?
 

The right of a child or young person to be listened to and taken seriously whenever decisions are made that affect them, is one that is accepted by almost every country. This two-part series explores this right.

Part One: This CPD explores why it is vital to involve children and young people, both individually and collectively, in their own learning and in the life of their communities.
Download Why listen to children and young people? Part One: An introduction here

Part Two: This CPD focuses on empowering those children and young people who may struggle not only to express their view, but to have that view heard.
Download Why listen to children and young people? Part Two: All voices matter here

Why work together?: Partnership working between parents and carers and schools 

Parents and carers play a crucial role in supporting their children’s learning, and research shows that levels of parental and carer engagement are consistently associated with better academic outcomes. This CPD explores the reasons why partnerships between parents and carers and schools are so important, the barriers that can stop it being effective, and some of the strategies and activities that can address these barriers.

Download Why work together?: Partnership working between parents and carers and schools here

Why work together? The benefits and challenges of multi-agency/multi-disciplinary working
 

The 2004 Children’s Act identified the need for a wide range of professionals, organisations, schools and other agencies to work together to support children, especially those with multiple or complex needs. A knowledge and understanding of how this works in practice, and the ingredients that make it successful, are important for all professionals working with children and young people, regardless of whether they are directly involved with this kind of collaborative working.

This CPD will therefore introduce you to some of the key professionals and their roles, and to explore what makes this kind of collaborative working successful.

Download Why work together? The benefits and challenges of multi-agency/multi-disciplinary working here